Civil Rights 2016-12-16T11:26:40+00:00

Civil Rights

As a citizen of the United States, you are afforded several freedoms and rights that you expect to be respected. Unfortunately, many people have their civil rights violated every day.

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits private and public employers from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, religion, and sex. The federal law also prohibits discrimination in the workplace based on age, disability, and pregnancy.

Along with private and public employers, civil rights lawsuits can be filed against municipalities, state actors, or the United States Government.

As a citizen of the United States, you are afforded several freedoms and rights that you expect to be respected. Unfortunately, many people have their civil rights violated every day.

Although law enforcement officers have the right to use reasonable force when performing their job duties, they are not permitted to use excessive force. Law enforcement officers are permitted to use force that is in proportion to the threat at hand. There is a fine line between reasonable force and excessive force, and law enforcement officers are charged with the duty of knowing when reasonable force turns into excessive force.

Victims can suffer from excessive force during the initial contact with law enforcement officers, during the pre-trial phase when the individual has been charged and is waiting in jail for trial, or it can occur after the victim has been convicted and is incarcerated in jail or prison.

If you believe that you may be the victim of excessive force, it is important to contact an experienced attorney immediately to ensure that there is adequate time to prepare for your case.

Civil rights lawsuits can be filed against local municipalities, state actors, or the United States Government.

As a citizen of the United States, you are afforded several freedoms and rights that you expect to be respected. Unfortunately, many people have their civil rights violated every day.

A false arrest occurs when you are physically detained, despite the fact that there is no evidence that you have committed a crime. False arrests commonly occur when a business employee, security guard, or some other third party detains you without any reasonable cause.

It is important to note that if a security guard, shop employee, or some other citizen watches someone commit a crime, then they are permitted to detain that individual. However, if you have been detained by a security guard or shop employee, and you did not commit a crime in front of them, then you may be the victim of false arrest.

When some other citizen detains you, this is known as a citizen’s arrest. If a citizen makes an arrest, he or she must notify law enforcement officials immediately and, if they fail to do so, then the arrest may be categorized as a false arrest.

In addition to any other individual citizen or company who commits a false arrest, civil rights lawsuits can be filed against local municipalities, state actors, or the United States Government.

As a citizen of the United States, you are afforded several freedoms and rights that you expect to be respected. Unfortunately, many people have their civil rights violated every day.

Employment discrimination laws prohibit harassment based on age, race, color, religion, national origin, or disability. If you have been harassed based on any of these categories, it is important that you notify your employer immediately. If your employer fails to address the issue, and the harassment continues, then you should notify the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).

In Georgia, you only have 180 days from the last act of harassment to file your claim with the EEOC. If you are even one day late with filing your claim, then you have lost your right to sue. Therefore, it is important that you act quickly in order to preserve your lawsuit.

In addition to any private or public employers who commit harassment, civil rights lawsuits can be filed against local municipalities, state actors, or the United States Government.

As a citizen of the United States, you are afforded several freedoms and rights that you expect to be respected. Unfortunately, many people have their civil rights violated every day.

Sexual abuse comes in several forms, such as: abuse against children; abuse by professionals; abuse by officials with authority; abuse by negligent security; and more.

Sexual abuse against children is a horrid offense. Common cases of sexual abuse against children involve abuse by family members, foster parents, teachers, coaches, day care facilities, and medical facilities.

Sexual abuse by professionals encompasses abuse by doctors, psychiatrists, or other professionals who abuse the victim while he or she is in their care.

Sexual abuse by officials with authority involves abuse by law enforcement officers, or other government employees who use their position of authority to force an individual to perform sexual acts.

Sexual abuse as a result of negligent security occurs when an area, such as a parking lot, hotel room, etc., has inadequate security, and a rape or sexual assault occurs because of the lack of security.

If you or a loved one have been the victim of sexual abuse, it is important that you seek medical attention immediately to preserve any evidence that may be critical to your case.

In addition to any other private citizens that may have committed sexual abuse, civil rights lawsuits can be filed against local municipalities, state actors, or the United States Government.

As a citizen of the United States, you are afforded several freedoms and rights that you expect to be respected. Unfortunately, many people have their civil rights violated every day.

Although law enforcement officers are permitted to use reasonable force when performing their job duties, when that reasonable force turns into excessive force, and the victim dies as a result of this excessive force, the victim’s family may be entitled to file a wrongful death lawsuit.

Civil rights lawsuits can be filed against local municipalities, state actors, or the United States Government.

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